Friday, March 13, 2015

Great Jewels from The Metropolitan Museum of Art


We are visiting the Metropolitan Museum of Art today. I really love this museum. I have been visiting since I was a little girl, and just love wandering around with no time limit! These are some photos of some lovely vintage jewelry they have on display. I really appreciated seeing the fancy hair combs, as my grandmother used to wear these with her long hair in a bun. The detail on these pieces are just so amazing. I think it is wonderful folks gift items to the museum so visitors can adore for many centuries. Enjoy !! 

Embodying the ideals of the Aesthetic and Arts and Crafts movements, Florence Koehler worked in a variety of decorative media, including domestic interiors, china decorating, jewelry, and painting. In jewelry, as in pottery and painting, Koehler exhibited a scholar's sense of the past and a modernist's eye for the contemporary. Favoring pearls, gems, unpolished gold, and muted enamel, she derived inspiration from Renaissance designs during her extended stays in England, France, and Italy.
This suite of a brooch (or pendant), necklace, and comb was made around 1905 for Emily Crane Chadbourne, daughter of the Chicago industrialist Richard T. Crane. The four-strand necklace has a gold clasp formed of green enameled leaves and a cluster of pearls. The necklace could be worn alone or with the accompanying emerald, sapphire, and pearl pendant attached to the clasp. With its four rectangular gems and alternating pearl clusters framing an oval cabochon, the brooch-pendant displays the designer's familiarity with Northern Renaissance models. Works such as this ensemble inspired the critic Roger Fry to credit Koehler in 1910 as an influential force in the "modern revival of craftsmanship." 

Necklace
Maker: Marie Zimmermann (American, Brooklyn, New York 1879–1972 Punta Gorda, Florida)
Date: 1920–28
Geography: Mid-Atlantic, New York, New York, United States
Culture: American
Medium: Gold, shattuckite, and coral
Dimensions: 17 in. (43.2 cm)
Credit Line: Gift of Jacqueline Loewe Fowler, 2011 
Maker: Edward Everett Oakes (American, 1891–1960)
Date: ca. 1925
Geography: New England, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Culture: American
Medium: Silver with colored stones including blue, pink and yellow sapphires, garnets, a tourmaline, and an emerald.
Dimensions: Length: 15 1/2 in. (39.4 cm) Cross: 3 1/8 x 1 7/8 in. (7.9 x 4.8 cm)
Credit Line: Gift of Jacqueline Loewe Fowler, 2014 
Necklace
Artist: Marie Zimmermann (American, Brooklyn, New York 1879–1972 Punta Gorda, Florida)
Date: ca. 1925
Geography: Mid-Atlantic, New York, New York, United States
Culture: American
Medium: Gold, enamel, pearls, green tourmalines and red garnets
Dimensions: 17 in. (43.2 cm)
Credit Line: Purchase, Barrie A. and Deedee Wigmore Foundation Gift, 2011 
Maker: Tiffany & Co. (1837–present)
Date: ca. 1910
Geography: Mid-Atlantic, New York, New York, United States
Culture: American
Medium: Tortoiseshell, platinum, diamonds
Dimensions: 4 1/8 x 4 1/4 in. (10.5 x 10.8 cm)
Credit Line: Gift of Susan Dwight Bliss, 1941 
Corsage Piece
Maker: Tiffany & Co. (1837–present)
Date: ca. 1880–1900
Geography: Mid-Atlantic, New York, New York, United States
Culture: American
Medium: Silver, gold, diamonds
Dimensions: 1 3/16 x 6 1/4 in. (3 x 15.9 cm)
Credit Line: Gift of Susan Dwight Bliss, 1941 
Covered jar ( all the way to the left in the photo) 
New England Glass Company
(1818–1888)
Date: 1883–88
Medium: Blown Amberina glass
On view in Gallery 706
 
Covered potpourri vase
Maker: Ott and Brewer (1871–1893)
Date: 1884–90
Geography: Mid-Atlantic, Trenton, New Jersey, United States
Culture: American
Medium: Porcelain
Dimensions: H. 13 1/2 in. (34.3 cm)
Classification: Ceramics
Credit Line: Purchase, Barrie A. and Deedee Wigmore Foundation Gift, 1994


I had to show you the last 2 vases as I thought they were just so lovely. I am a huge fan of the glass vases and the ceramic one's colors are just delightful !!

Would be thrilled if you gave me a follow here: 


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